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7 World Heritage Site that Might Be Will Disappear in the Future

1. Historic Centre of Vienna, Austria

Vienna has witnessed of early Celtic and Roman settlements into the medieval and baroque city. Later became the capital of the Austro-Hungarian Empire. This is a city full of baroque architectures such as Baroque castles and gardens also 19th century Ringstrasse. The city with its historical values is threatened because of the city development. The height of the new constructions that was built around the site will change the values of the site and probably if this matters unresolved, in next few years we will lose that “historical feelings” in Vienna. The city also will change into more metropolitans than the classic one.

Historic Centre of Vienna, Austria
https://whc.unesco.org/en/documents/114397
Historic Centre of Vienna, Austria
https://whc.unesco.org/en/documents/114399
Historic Centre of Vienna, Austria




https://whc.unesco.org/en/documents/114402

2. Archaeological sites of Sabratha, Libya

Sabratha has been used by Phoenician as a trading post. It was functioned as an outlet for African heartland. It was also a region of Numidian Kingdom of Massinisa. The conflict in Libya increases the military actions around the archaeological sites of Sabratha. This situations put this sites at risk and destroy the ruins. If that happens, in the future we can’t see the ruins as we see it today.

Archaeological sites of Sabratha, Libya
https://whc.unesco.org/en/documents/108975
Archaeological sites of Sabratha, Libya
https://whc.unesco.org/en/documents/108976
Archaeological sites of Sabratha, Libya
https://whc.unesco.org/en/documents/108977

3. Historic Centre of Shakhrisyabz, Uzbekistan

The site located on the silk road in southern Uzbekistan. The city is over 2,000 years old. In the 14th and 15th century, the city became the political and cultural center of the Kesh region. The city also rich in historical monuments from the Temurids period. For example, the Ak-Sarai Palace (a palace with bold design), The Dorus Saodat (a complex of burial for the ruling family), and The covered Chor-Su Bazaar (a place where you can find 15th-century baths that still in use today). This historic site begins to change its historic values because of the construction of modern facilities. If modern development doesn’t give away for this city to sustain, probably in the next ten years this city will be buried under modern infrastructures.

Historic Centre of Shakhrisyabz, Uzbekistan
https://whc.unesco.org/en/documents/113163
Historic Centre of Shakhrisyabz, Uzbekistan
https://whc.unesco.org/en/documents/113168
Historic Centre of Shakhrisyabz, Uzbekistan
https://whc.unesco.org/en/documents/113170

4. Old towns of Djenné, Mali

Djenné is one of the oldest towns in sub-Saharan Africa. It was inhabited since 250 BC. This town was functioned as a market center and had an important connection in the trans-Saharan Gold Trade. The old towns of Djenné symbolized the typical African city and Islamic architecture in sub-Saharan Africa. The unique thing about this city is it was built on hillocks to prevent a flood. The characteristics of this town make it prone to erosion. The vague boundaries that the town has, will also create urbanization and building development that will decrease the value of the town.

Old towns of Djenné, Mali
https://whc.unesco.org/en/documents/107919
Old towns of Djenné, Mali
https://whc.unesco.org/en/documents/107927
Old towns of Djenné, Mali
https://whc.unesco.org/en/documents/107937

5. Hatra, Iraq

Hatra in Iraq is a city that raised under the influence of Parthian empire.  Hatra is the capital of the first Arab Kingdom. In 116 and 198 AD, the Romans invaded Hatra but the city fought back. The city was not conquered because of its high and thick walls strengthen the towers. This heritage site has been affected by the armed conflict which damaging the ruins.

Hatra, Iraq
https://whc.unesco.org/en/documents/109726
Hatra, Iraq
https://whc.unesco.org/en/documents/109728
Hatra, Iraq
https://whc.unesco.org/en/documents/109732

6. Birthplace of Jesus, Palestine

Church of the Nativity and pilgrimage route is about 10 km from southern Jerusalem. It was identified as the birthplace of Jesus since the 2nd century. The cave where the church was built is believed to be the birthplace of Jesus. Nativity itself is the place where Christianity begins and one of the holiest place for Christians. The buildings itself is vulnerable especially the roof of the main church. Lack of maintenance and repair and increase in the small industry making the area polluted which bring negative impact to the facade of the church and buildings in the pilgrimage route.

Birthplace of Jesus, Palestine
https://whc.unesco.org/en/documents/117541
Birthplace of Jesus, Palestine
https://whc.unesco.org/en/documents/119377
Birthplace of Jesus, Palestine
https://whc.unesco.org/en/documents/119380

7. Old Walled City of Shibam, Yemen

The old walled city of Shibam in Yemen is the great examples of urban city planning, besides being the oldest. It shows the first vertical infrastructure and tower come out from the cliff. The city was made from sun-dried mud brick and has been called as the  “Manhattan of the desert”. In AD 300 it was the capital city of Hadramaut. Even though the city is remarkably stunning but the construction is vulnerable from flood as in during disastrous flood in  20the 08.

Old Walled City of Shibam, Yemen
https://whc.unesco.org/en/documents/109041
Old Walled City of Shibam, Yemen
https://whc.unesco.org/en/documents/109042
Old Walled City of Shibam, Yemen
https://whc.unesco.org/en/documents/109044

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